One Year

With each day that passes, I’m more acutely aware that Scott and I have been actively trying to conceive our child for officially a year now. Perhaps the thought of “a year” makes it seem longer than it has been in reality. Twelve months. One year.

I cannot believe what this year has held. Countless prescription hormones. Oral, injections, patches, suppositories. The myriad of side effects: hot flashes, insomnia, migraines, dehydration, bloating, chills, pain, mood swings, crying spells, bruises, nightmares, 30 pounds of weight gain, and probably more that I’ve forgotten with time. Literally dozens of early morning drives to our Beachwood clinic and a couple even further out to Avon to make sure my specific doctor was the one doing any needed tests. Labs and more labs, scar tissue building under each antecubital vein. Oh and transvaginal ultrasounds – literally dozens. They used to make me feel violated but now knowing that every tech in the office has seen my female anatomy, external and internal? It just makes me feel even more numb.

The Beachwood office is grey and drab but the secretaries and nurses add bits of color. This place is where I watched all of my follicles grow, it’s where my embryos rest, frozen in time, and it’s where I was promised hope. It’s where both of my intrauterine inseminations were cancelled, where we found out I wouldn’t be having a 5-day transfer, where over a dozen follicles were extracted from my ovaries while propofol kept me sleeping and as the nurse anesthetist put it, fentanyl kept me from writhing in pain. It’s where my husband’s sperm was injected into my eggs and the cells in our embryos later multiplied into blastocysts. It’s where I woke up after IVF, tears streaming from the months of pain before combined with the screaming, acute pain of the needles that had just pierced my vagina and ovaries fifteen times. I prayed to God that morning and silently hoped that all of this was worth it, that every tear, every procedure, every hope and disappointment, every check written would soon be worth it.

A year probably seems so insurmountable because of the questions that never leave my mind. Was a year a fair deadline, or was it merely a super-imposed notion? If we are not pregnant at a year, would that mean our chances were higher or lower that we would soon – or ever – meet our child? What does “a year” really mean; what does it really define?

I hope to find out soon, but for now I know that my husband and I are the 1 in 8. We have infertility, and I think we have it bad. We have given our hearts, souls, and finances in hopes of bringing a child into this world. Our families and communities have rooted for us, supported us, and prayed for us on this journey. (Thank you.) But what is a journey anyways? Does it always end at a destination? Maybe not always the one that hopes and dreams and aching hearts are made of. And that is a fear too big for me to say out loud.

I once had a dream (while on ovarian stimulating shots, where the dreams are extra vibrant, cruel, and detailed) where I had finally given birth to the perfect child, a sweet and beautiful daughter. It horrifies me that my mind remembers the graphic details during which a man with no face stormed into our peaceful hospital room past my husband and I and grabbed the swaddled bundle of joy right from my arms. The man was screaming that it had been a mistake, aggressively shouting that I did not have a baby after all. I sat there with my mouth wide open, traumatized to a point of no return. Each time I hit that point in recalling that story, my mind fades to black.

So, one year. It’s been a cruel one punctuated with hope. Yet I plead with you, Time, “Please don’t let there be a second year of this.” I’m not sure my heart could bear it. So for now, let each new day on this journey only hasten the arrival of the hope of our promise. May this territory never become our familiar.

An update and an invitation

It’s been so long since my last update. I’ve been busy enjoying life and, oh, just getting engaged to my best friend and biggest, sweetest supporter. 🙂 We are getting married in the spring, and we couldn’t be more excited.

View More: http://footstepsphotography.pass.us/goodwinengagement

I’m nearing four years with my new liver, and it is so healthy. I only have one more year of the hepatocellular carcinoma protocol and then I’m officially in the clear. I’m doing well since my last major surgery last August and the reconstruction has not only helped cosmetically but it has radically eliminated my adhesion pain. If you have had multiple whole-abdominal surgeries like I have and you suffer from pain from adhesions (or undiagnosed, piercing abdominal pain) please look into this. Insurance covered mine since it was done for medical reasons (adhesion pain). Before the surgery, I was going to the ER regularly for sharp, overwhelming abdominal pain, and I haven’t had to go in at all since the surgery. The surgery was pretty major, lots of staples (or was it stitches? I don’t remember), and I ended up in the ICU afterward due to almost going into sepsis, but the pain was completely worth it. I’d do it again in a heartbeat.

As I’m on immunosuppressants to prevent my body from rejecting my liver and suffer from a few chronic illnesses, my immune system is pretty weak. I have always been regularly sick, frequently on antibiotics, etc. I finally got fed up and saw a renowned ENT (ear nose throat) doctor at the Cleveland Clinic, Dr. Geelan-Hansen. After one look in my throat, she suggested that she remove my tonsils. I had been told before that they were “cryptic tonsils,” which means that they were so swollen they would rest on the back of my throat. She told me it would be two weeks of the worst pain in my life (that’s a LOT of serious pain to beat!) and to stock up on all of the soft, cold foods I could find. I was afraid of what could possibly be more painful than a liver transplant but was pleasantly surprised how minimal the pain was. Eating Jell-O, ice cream, and oatmeal for two weeks in January was far worse than enduring the pain. However, my throat has not hurt a single time since recovery from surgery, and that is a big accomplishment for me!

I found myself calling Dr. Geelan-Hansen again this spring after half a dozen ear infections, and we decided to add tubes to my ears as well. This happened a couple weeks ago. Ear tubes help fluid drain out of ears rather than sit around and cause infections, and so far, I’m enjoying no more ear infections! I had them inserted under general anesthesia, and I’m definitely glad I did that as the post-op pain was pretty bad for about a day.

I have been so much better, as far as getting sick goes, since both surgeries.

Around the time of the tonsillectomy, I was getting overly upset about my chronic pain. Every single day, I was in excruciating pain, and anything I did just made it worse. As I’ve mentioned before, I have tried every single pain relief option (medication or treatment such as massage/physical therapy) for years and nothing has worked enough to continue it. A friend recommended that I see a local rheumatologist who almost cured her pain, but I had procrastinated because I didn’t think the doctor would be able to make much of a difference. This winter, I decided it couldn’t hurt to try. Dr. Azem was so compassionate and kind and also a genius. After one look at me, she had several points of evidence that I had psoriatic arthritis. She ordered some labs to rule out other things and upon a second visit, she confirmed the diagnosis. It’s basically an autoimmune form of arthritis that produces severely painful, swollen joints. It typically causes psoriasis, too, which is a skin disorder, but thankfully I don’t suffer from those symptoms at this time. So while I didn’t need any more diagnoses, I was happy that we now had some new treatment options to consider.

Between careful discussions with both my rheumatologist and my transplant team, we decided a drug called a biologic would be the best first course of treatment for my PsA. There are several biologics, all taken via injection or through an intravenous line (IV), and my doctor thought Enbrel would be the best treatment for to start with. I have been injecting myself weekly with Enbrel for around four months now, and I’m happy to say my pain has decreased. It hasn’t been a miracle drug, but I have noticed a difference in my pain levels. I am so thrilled to report that. The shots burn pretty badly, and I’m no baby when it comes to pain, but 30 minutes of icing my leg before the injection helps a little bit. I have some other ideas on reducing injection pain that I will share later after I try them.

I’m also experimenting with natural remedies like super foods and essential oils which I am loving and will share once I try a few more things I have in progress.

The PsA flare ups are horrible. (I have been having them before the diagnosis but I considered them to be fibromyalgia flares.) Flares are a short time (weeks/month) when the pain is completely out of control, and they come from absolutely no where without any warning. I’m thankful that there is also a treatment for PsA flares – steroids and pain medications. Steroids, while definitely not a drug I would choose to take, decrease the inflammation, and the non-narcotic prescription pain medications take the edge off.

Compared to my health at certain times in the past, I am so great. No big surgeries, no more chemo, no more balancing on the tightrope over death. I really couldn’t ask for anything more than I have now, both physically and in my personal life. Of course I sometimes still struggle with my new normal, and I wish I had as much energy or as low pain as “average” people, but this is my reality. This is what God has given me, and it’s my job to make the best of it and inspire others with the provision He has given me throughout the past 22 years of illness. Each day, I think of how much I owe to my organ donor for so many more opportunities to live my life to the fullest. I wish I could repay him in some way, so I just pray for his family and hope to meet him in heaven one day. He is my angel.

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Also, it’s that time of year again!! It’s my team’s 4th annual Lifebanc Gift of Life Walk & Run at Blossom Music Center! So far, we are going to surpass our record for biggest team in our team’s history! I am so blessed to have such a great support system to support such a life-changing organization as well as the fact that I’m alive because someone said “YES” to organ donation. Please click here to view more information. I am officially inviting you to be a part of a truly fun, exciting morning. Please consider joining our team or even donating the cost of tomorrow’s latte for the cause of organ donation in Northeast Ohio!

Love to you all.