5 Years.

5 years seems so short sometimes.  Tiny babies grow to age 5 right before your eyes.  My dog is 11, and that happened out of no where! Has it really been 2 years since I’ve been out of the country?  My parent’s house is 19 years old? I can’t even believe Scott and I have been married for almost 6 months (what?!) Everything feels like it just happened.

But this week, time has stood still; it has felt like something so long, something so very substantial.

Monday was my 5 year anniversary of receiving my new liver.  I think back to what the past five years have held, and they have been full of so much.  I recently heard from someone that their mother had the disease I had (PSC) and it turned into cancer, which eventually took her life.  That’s the road I was on.  I was so close, and I barely even knew it.  I will be thankful for my donor every single moment of every single day because he quite literally saved my life.  I don’t know him, or really anything much about him, but I feel for his family who lost a son.  Perhaps a brother, a grandson, and a nephew. A friend, a classmate.  It is hard to celebrate knowing you’re doing it while another family is still grieving, and will grieve beyond the length of time.

5th transplantversary

But we do celebrate, even though sometimes bittersweet, we were able to celebrate on Monday night.  My husband surprised me with a big cookie cake that said “Happy Transplant-versary” on it, and we enjoyed dinner together and celebrated the life of a guy who was just turning a few years old the night I got “the call” for my transplant.  We were out for a birthday dinner to celebrate his sweet life, and I had no idea that it would be the last place I’d go, the last thing I’d do, until my phone would wake me up just past midnight on August 31 with the message that my organ was en route to the Cleveland Clinic and to get there as soon as possible.  I jumped into the shower, found some comfy clothes, and loaded last minute-items into my bag, knowing I’d be in the hospital for awhile.  Confident, but unsure of exactly what to expect, my parents drove me to waiting gifted surgeons, doctors, and nurses.

In a matter of hours, I went through something that changed my life completely.  A liver was a good thing, yes, but we would have a waiting period to see how well my body adjusted to it.  There was also the recovery period that the nurses told me would take about a year.  (I never did believe them until 5 months later when I tried to resume my bachelors degree in nursing.  I quickly believed them and put my life back on hold.)  My immune system would be affected forever.  I would start a new medication for life.  I would have lots of return appointments, CT scans, and lab work.  I don’t know if I’d be up for recovery again, and it did add a good amount of wear to my body, but as crazy as it sounds, it’s been worth it.

The hardest time in my life was worth seeing my sister graduate with her MBA.  It was worth being by my dad’s side after a bad accident landed him in the ICU.  It was worth me meeting Scott, my now-husband. It was worth going to Ireland with my college’s nursing school, and it was worth going to Switzerland and revisiting France with my college’s public health program.  It was worth all of the new people I’ve met.  It was worth being with Haylie as she’s grown.  It was worth being immunocompromised and getting sick more often than usual.  It was worth getting to plan my wedding with my super gifted mom.  It was worth it to be welcomed into Scott’s wonderful family.  It was worth it to get to live in my own house.  And it was worth finally being able to complete my baccalaureate degree after 9 years of fighting against my body.

Each day, I’m cautious about not catching any illnesses, and I need to get my sleep quota, and I still have psoriatic arthritis and get allergy shots and go to several doctors…  That’s fine though.  It may sound like a lot to you, but I’m used to it.  This has been my life for 23 years as I was diagnosed as a small girl. But I’m thankful that the Lord has allowed me to accept this as my life and that I’ve been able to make the best of it.  None of these days were guaranteed to me, so I can only see each new day as a gift.  Because if it wasn’t for my new liver, my days would have been limited.  They still are to an extent – I won’t live to be 1000.  But I went from a hopeless diagnosis to a lifetime of love and memories and gratitude.  That’s more than all right with me.

I like to think of my donor looking down on me and being proud of the experiences I’ve had.  He knows how thankful I am. I also like to think of my liver-sibling who received 1/3 of my liver as a tiny infant, and I hope and pray the child is a happy, healthy 5 year old today.  Our transplant was really so miraculous.  It’s a heavy gift that weighs on your soul yet lifts you up, somehow, at the same time.  Worth it.

And here’s to many more 5 years!!

This journey…

As some of you know, I (finally) graduated in August after 9 years in college.  And as some of you also know, for all of those years, I fought and fought to get ahead despite my many health challenges.  I had to take a year off after a car accident, another year off after my liver transplant, and semesters off for my subsequent abdominal surgeries.

I began college in 2005 pursuing my nursing degree at Kent State.  I excelled and felt like I had found my calling.  I can’t even describe how I felt when caring for my patients.  It gratified my soul so deeply knowing I was able to give back to people in need, encourage them, or help them through a hard time.  I earned high grades in a rough, competitive program and made friends with my instructors.  It sounds like the perfect story, right?

Well, I was still battling a life-threatening liver disease.  I could barely make it through an 8 hour clinical shift without feeling like my body was going to fall apart.  The work was very physical, and it set off my fibromyalgia and arthritis pain in the worst way imaginable.  The stress of a, well, high-stress program wore me thin.  24-7, I was either sleeping, studying, or in class/clinical, even in the summer.  My body suffered so much during these years, and I believe it sustained permanent damage from me not listening to it, but I was doing so well at my school work, thriving as I was being continuously challenged, and enjoying the patients so much.

Then came the tumor that randomly appeared on my liver. At the end of a very normal semester in nursing school, a routine CT scan showed it clearly.  The tumor was inoperable and in a location that made it untestable.  We were to proceed, assuming the worst: cancer.

I was quite literally told to put my entire life on hold and then fight for it.

I wasn’t ready for any of that or anything else that came that summer.  Who is?  No one is ever truly ready when these things happen.

God gave me so much peace during that summer – so dramatically noticeable that I will never be able to deny it.  However, all of the tests, the chemo… there was so much physical pain.

Then came the pinnacle of physical pain and the resumption of emotional and mental pain.  More like anguish.  The surgery caused the absolute worst pain – pain, after 18 years of liver disease, that I never even knew was possible.  I had to learn to eat again, walk again, go up stairs again.  Every muscle in my abdomen had been cut through, and I became quite skilled at protecting my excruciating abdomen where 50 staples once lived.   I had to learn to live with an even more fragile immune system than I had before.  The first 6 months, for these reasons and more, were torture.  If it weren’t for the outpouring of love and support from so many people and the knowledge that a young man died so I could live, I don’t know if I could have gotten through it.

After living like that for awhile, you are pretty much begging for life to go back to normal.  My doctors advised me to take one year off of school to completely recover, but I, Ms. Type A, was determined I was going to return to school for spring semester, 2011, barely 4.5 months after my surgery.

As I was told, I crashed and burned.  So that semester never really amounted to anything even though I tried.

Around that time, I saw my infectious disease doctor.  These doctors specialize in keeping transplant patients (who are immunocompromised) safe from any type of communicable (contagious/transmittable) illness and are highly trained in what they do.  My doctor told me, in no uncertain terms, that nursing school was not an option with my new immune system.  I began taking anti-rejection medications to prevent my body from rejecting my new organ, and as a result, the medications suppressed my immune system.  She told me I would catch anything my patients had and even basic illnesses could turn into “worst case scenarios” with my immune system.  (Which last month, we found to be true – blog post coming up soon.)  I had some acceptance issues so for the time being, she wrote a letter for me to be excused from seeing any patients with communicable illnesses.  Even without contagious patients, being in a hospital a couple days a week, I knew I was walking on thin ice.  Germs are everywhere in hospitals, and anyone working in one leaves covered in a multitude of bacteria.

I proceeded like this for awhile until I eventually was able to get to a point of acceptance and heed my doctor’s advice. It was a long, emotionally difficult process for me.

The end of my nursing career was more of a move out of desperation and the realization that I had ZERO options left.  I could not even begin to tell you the options I tried – I was like a crazy person looking into everything and consulting everyone I could trying to fit a square peg in a round hole.

Even if I could get through school, any job I took would require me being with sick patients.  If I wanted a job on a “not sick” unit such as case management, I would need 2 years of experience on a typical unit with sick patients.  I had literally exhausted all options when I, myself exhausted, heard about a newer college at Kent State – the College of Public Health.  The rest is history.

In an effort to publicize their growing online options, Kent State has been interviewing students with unique experiences who ended up being successful with online-only baccalaureate programs.  An employee interviewed me and wrote up an article, and it hit a major Cleveland news station today.  Go ahead and check it out to see how the story ended, or rather, continued.

I hope that my story first of all, provides someone with hope, that they, too, can overcome any struggle and end up successful and happy.  I don’t believe the “you can accomplish everything you put your mind to” myth.  What’s best for you is all that will work out. Each of us is incapable of doing certain things well, and perhaps this is God’s way of letting us find our true calling using our individual genuine gifts.  I believe we need to try our hardest and fight for what we want to achieve, but when that’s not possible and we have truly exhausted all options, we need to know when to stop and fight for a new dream, always believing a Higher Power is orchestrating something greater than we could ever know.

Secondly, I hope that this story honors my donor.   Someone lost their teenage son, and solely because of that tragedy, I’m alive to tell my story, his story.  It’s my highest honor.

None of this is without extreme gratitude and humility.  I have done none of this on my own but faced each day at a time and fought for my life, both literally and figuratively.  I owe every bit of this to God, my donor, my super supportive friends and family, my amazing transplant surgeon, Dr. Eghtesad, and world-class team of doctors at the Cleveland Clinic, the deans and instructors at the KSU College of Public Health, and the enormous support of the Student Accessibility Services on campus.

As seen on WKYC:

Amanda

Liver transplant patient completes Kent State degree

She completed almost three years of nursing school when doctors said it was time for a liver transplant.

AKRON, Ohio — Amanda Goodwin of Akron, Ohio, is no stranger to adversity. When she was 5 years old, she was diagnosed with a progressive liver disease that would eventually require a liver transplant.

In May 2010, she had completed almost three years of nursing school and was doing really well when doctors discovered a tumor and said it was time for a transplant.

“My doctors advised me to not move forward in nursing because I was so susceptible to possible infections due to an immunosuppressant drug I had to begin taking,” Goodwin explained. “That wasn’t easy to hear.”

Despite having to take nearly a year off to recuperate, Goodwin still wanted to finish a degree from Kent State University.

“So I was looking at my options, and I heard that Kent State’s College of Public Health offered a number of online options,” Goodwin said. “I thought that would be perfect for me because I was recovering and actually required two more abdominal surgeries. I couldn’t attend classes regularly, but I was still interested in pursuing a degree in healthcare. So I decided to transfer to a public health program at Kent State because it’s all online and if I needed help, campus was only 15 minutes away.”

Despite her health issues, Goodwin participated in a two-week intensive course in Geneva, Switzerland, in May 2013. Ken Slenkovich, assistant dean of Kent State’s College of Public Health, led the trip.

“During the trip to Geneva, I got to know Assistant Dean Slenkovich, and he was nothing but supportive though everything,” Goodwin said. “Throughout my time in the College of Public Health, everyone on his staff worked closely with me, even when I had health setbacks.”

Slenkovich was immediately impressed with Goodwin.

“The trip afforded me the time to spend with her, and I found her to be a delightful and bright young lady,” Slenkovich said. “She’s very passionate about public health and wants to apply her knowledge to help people.”

“I’m healthier now,” Goodwin said with a laugh. “And I’m happy to say I graduated last August.”

Goodwin, who graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Public Health with a concentration in health promotion and education, is enthusiastic when talking about taking classes online.

“I loved the public health online program,” Goodwin said. “I loved every class I took. I focused my studies on health education and promotion, and I really thrived. Everything was so organized. The notes were there, the videos were there, the links – everything.”

Given her occasionally uneven stamina during her recovery, Goodwin loved the ability to work on her classes on her own schedule.

“I was able to maintain my grades and do it on my time,” she said “I’m so glad I found that program because otherwise I don’t know what I would be doing right now.”

She also enjoyed getting to know other students in the online program.

“I interacted with lots of other online students,” Goodwin said. “It’s funny because I didn’t meet them in person until graduation.”

Goodwin is especially pleased that she can still work in the healthcare field.

“With my degree, I feel like I can help just as many people, if not more, than I would with a nursing degree,” Goodwin said. “It’s just that it would be in a different form. I can still help people.”

As for the future, Goodwin is busy planning her wedding this spring, and she’s optimistic about the future.

“I would love to work at Lifebanc, which is Northeast Ohio’s organ donation and procurement agency,” Goodwin said. “That would be my dream job. I may have an opportunity to complete a master’s degree, so that might be in my future.”

Kent State is a leader in the state and the nation in offering online courses and degrees. Since 2009, online enrollment at Kent State has grown 900 percent, and the number of online instructors at Kent State has grown from 86 to more than 600.

Kent State’s College of Public Health was established in 2009 to educate and train students to meet the current and projected shortage of public health professionals in Ohio and the nation. It is one of only two colleges of public health in Ohio and the first to offer a Bachelor of Science in Public Health. Its academic programs integrate theory and practice to equip graduates with the knowledge and skills to address the health challenges of the 21st century.

Photo credit: Stephanie Doyle

Not them

It was a wonderful Saturday with my mentor, Rita, as we sat down for another quiet yet passionate discussion about the blessings we receive or the issues we face.  Rita is special to me as she is the mother of a friend I grew up with at school since first grade, and she was my seventh grade science teacher.  We had not seen each other in years, and we were purposefully matched together in a mentoring program.  God had a hand in the match up as we have strikingly similar personalities, struggles, and challenges.  Rita has gone through many relationship and health obstacles and has fought through everything with grace and beauty.  She has much insight on suffering and living fully despite it, noticing God’s blessings each step of the way.

Rita

And so on this particular day, I mentioned to her how I’ve been in heightened realization of my physical weaknesses lately. I told her how I’ve felt opposition from a couple of individuals as they sometimes judge me independent of my pain and fatigue, my daily struggle to live as normal of a life as possible for a patient with fibromyalgia, chronic pain, and a past of 17 years of liver disease ending with a liver transplant and two subsequent surgeries. I bemoaned how I deeply wish they could see my point of view, how desperately hard I want them to realize what I deal with each day so they could tread more cautiously and deliberately.  Of course, I meant it figuratively as in wishing they could just imagine what kind of physical and emotional pain I deal with and how my various thresholds can be so challenged at times.

Pausing to choose her words and then in her gentlest voice, she said this to me.

At times, we so greatly wish for people to see where we walk, yet at the same time, we try harder to hide it from them and pray in the depths of our hearts that they will never truly know what we experience.

As frustrating as it is, I am realizing it’s a good thing these people cannot relate to me because to be able to fully do so, they would have had to not only journey beside me through the years as they have done so diligently, but rather physically suffer through exactly what I have over the years.

My mind stopped immediately at this realization.  I whispered intently, “I wouldn’t wish this on my worst enemy.”

“Yes,” she continued. “There are times I cannot even tell my daughter exactly what I’m going through. It would kill her to know.”

Oh how true. For example, I have been protecting my these loved ones, shielding them from the worst, ever since I was in elementary school. They don’t know this, and I don’t even want to tell them now. To hide things like this from people so close almost sounds like a punishable wrongdoing. Yet we continue on in order to protect our loved ones, and we hold our breath hoping and praying they will never go through what we have, no not possibly that. Not this. Not anyone, but especially not them.

And so I proceed, journey on, more tolerant of their judgments, tempers, and inability to understand as I strive to daily thank the Lord that they just can’t comprehend what I’ve endured.

It’s not easy; I will assure you of that.  But when you love people, it’s really the only option.

May we take pleasure in our sufferings as they draw us nearer to our Lord and Him to us. He has willingly been through anything we could ever face in life just so He can truly, 100% understand what it feels like and in the meantime, guide us triumphantly to the other side.

Liver Mamas

“My name is Kai.  My last name is Fairy Princess!” she’ll tell you.  She’s a happy, spunky preschooler.  You’d never know that when she was 4 months old, Kai received a liver transplant because she had biliary atresia.  Her daddy donated part of his to her, saving her life.  Read About Kai on her mom’s blog to get a picture of what a little girl with a life illness is like.  Seemingly healthy on the outside but living a life just like I did at her age – adjusting normal to mean meds, hospitals, tests, procedures.  Growing up thinking that is normal.  Oh, to be that innocent again.  To be too young to realize that your normal is not normal.  Stay young, sweet Kai.  Stay young.

Jasmine, Kai’s mother, keeps a beautiful blog chronicling her daughter’s journey.  I asked if I could share one of my favorite posts of hers, and she gave me permission.  I think everyone needs to understand what mothers/fathers/parents of “sick kids” have to go through.  Now at 24, I’m really realizing that it wasn’t only me suffering for all of these years.  It must have been hell for my parents.  I wonder if some days still are hell for them.  None of us signed up for this, but together, we draw strength, and we get through whatever is coming up next.  I hope you enjoy this post by Jasmine and visit her sweet blog.  I would love to meet the Hollingsworth family one day and give Kai a big hug.

Watch this sweet video of Kai…

Now without further ado, here is “Once a Liver Mama, Always a Liver Mama” by Jasmine Hollingsworth.  I dedicate this to my Liver Mama – you know you’re not alone.  Thank you for always fighting for me and for never leaving my side.  Only a few months until you’ll be a Liver Mama of 20 years.  I love you, Mom.  I wish you could be some other kind of mama, but I’m glad I was blessed with you.  I can’t imagine going through these years with anyone else by my side for every single moment of fear, all of the pain, and even the bright beacons of hope.  We have a unique relationship because of the battles we’ve fought hand in hand for 19 years, and I treasure you all the more for it.

As I sit and keep a distant, online vigil for a baby and a family I have never met, I am forced to reflect.
 
Liver Mommas: We support each other. We share our stories, our joy, our pain, our disappointments, our triumphs, our hope, our advice… But, most of all, we share the experience of having a child with a life-threatening liver disease, more often than not, leading to transplant and the life-long trials and complications that come with that.
 
When someone announces “THE call has come; a match has been found!” We rejoice. Those of us who have been through transplant feel the excitement, the anxiety and the rush of conflicting emotions that we remember from our own experience. Those who have not, I imagine, feel the excitement and hope, fear and longing that goes with the waiting and watching your child grow more ill. 
 
When we hear “There are complications, we need prayers!” We bow our heads and fervently whisper words of love and hope to be carried to heaven, knowing the fear and the way time freezes as you wait to hear that, hopefully, everything will be okay.
 
Sometimes, with a profound sadness that cannot be expressed, we receive the devestating news that a tiny spirit was too great for this earthly world and was called to heaven. Those of us who have never experienced this have a mixture of emotion… grief for the life lost and the family, a desire to reach out to comfort where we know there can be none, a gripping fear in the knowledge that our story could have followed the same path (and maybe still could), guilt that we were “the lucky ones”, and a renewed appreciation for the life of our own children and each day we are blessed to spend with them.  
 
To those of you waiting, we know it seems endless. We remember the hope and we hope with you. To those of you recovering, it’s a long road, but you and your child will get there. One day you will look back at how far you have come and marvel at all that has been accomplished. To those of you who have come out pink and rosy on the other side, we celebrate and cherish each day with you, knowing that tomorrow could bring new challenges and fears. To those of you who have experienced the loss of your precious baby, I have no words of comfort; saying that I’m sorry for your loss does not even begin to adequately cover the depth of my empathy. 
 
I can say this, though: Once a Liver Momma, always a Liver Momma.

5 Star Accommodations!

Here we are again, 4am and wide awake. This time my best friend Danielle is beside me, and we are both enjoying our “five star accommodations” here at the hospital.

Yesterday, my oncology and infectious disease doctors, as well as my PCP, came by to update my status. Everyone ordered more tests (xray, ultrasound, more blood cultures & labs, a swab) which have so many pros/cons that I’m trying not to think about them.

On another side, today I have 5 total visitors coming which will be lovely. 🙂 Yesterday my Grandma and sweet Aunt Tammy came to visit, and that was so nice. Then Danielle hung out with me last night and is here staying with me.  My mom has been here most of the time, too. Its great to feel such support. Talk soon! 🙂 Amanda

Just an update…
Amanda 

2 months

It’s been two months since my liver transplant, and I can’t believe where I’ve been during these past 8 weeks.  I can’t believe what I’ve been through, the support I’ve been shown, and how wonderful God is to stand by His children.  I can’t believe I made it through what I have, and when I think of what I still have to endure to get through this, I’m comforted knowing the worst part just has to be over by now.

Rewind… August 31st, 2010, the middle of the night.

What a difference a phone call can make.

Or what a difference eight hours can make… when you’re in a deep sedation, lying on a cold, metal table with your abdomen sliced open in three directions, doctors working all around you to remove a diseased, dying liver and its hardened vessels to replace it with a healthy donor’s organ and properly functioning vessels.  You know it’s probably not the same kind of eight hours for your family and friends waiting nearby, and you feel guilty for making them go through that kind of waiting, you know, the kind where you don’t know if your loved one is going to wake up or not, wondering what condition she’ll be in if she does wake up, wondering what the road ahead will truly be like…

What an amazingly short, yet life-changing journey it is to be living one evening, at a fun birthday party, in fact, not even dreaming you’d be awakened by a phone call in a few hours… fast forward to the very next time you are awakened… this time, with a new organ inside your body, a list of strong, foreign medications now running through your system, 50 staples going in every direction across your abdomen, a breathing tube frustrating you, and a thousand lines, tubes, and drains running into and out of you in every direction.

You wonder how it’s possible to gain 20 pounds of fluid when you were, well, 20 pounds lighter the last time you remember existing.  It’s everywhere, and it seems the center of gravity is in your middle, which is so swollen that it appears to be anything below your neck and above your legs, also perceived as tree trunks.  That’s what a difference a few hours can make.

Slowly… the pain pump is taken away.  The meds are weaned to normal levels.  Labs, vitals, and blood sugars are measured around the clock.  Certain systems don’t work.  Certain systems are affected negatively by the new medications.  Sleep is a gift, and getting in and out of bed is the most painful realization.  Getting comfortable in bed is a rare treat, and even at that, the nurse brings you pain medications.  Breathing is a chore, and walking is a feat.  You can’t shower or brush your hair, and you can’t bend, twist, or reach.  Your arms are the only strength you have, and without them you wouldn’t be able to get out of bed on your own or adjust your body on your mound of pillows.   You deem it nearly impossible it is to exist without any structured abdominal muscles, and you wish you were past this part already.

You soon wonder why you packed 4 or 5 bags about a month ago.  Did you seriously think this would be easy, and the week-long hospital stay would be long, boring, and almost unnecessary?  One bag for all the time (even ICU!), another for when you get to a real floor, one for when you’re bored and want things to do, and one for your clothes.  Because you hope to be wearing real clothes after a few days.  Right.  You will later laugh because you were very content to be in a hospital gown – not even your designer gowns but the hospital’s gowns(!) because your incision was so messy and the clothes didn’t fit your new swollen body anyways.  Then, towards the end of the week, you remember the cute bathrobes you packed and wear them instead of double-gowning, and that works for the rest of the time.  But really…. 5 books to read and cards to play and your MacBook Pro?!  You barely even used your iPad!  Coloring books and the huge box of crayons for boredom? Sleep won that choice.

Anyways, each day, you lose a little more fluid, while at the same time, each day, you’re surprised to find a new area that’s swollen to unbelievable levels.  You feel like a stranger to your body.  You refer to yourself as a whale, and you quite honestly are.  But one day, you step on the big hospital scale and realize you’ve lost 10 pounds!   The next, another 10!  The doctors say to be patient because, while you’re starting to have more defined body segments than just “a middle,” it will take a couple of months to lose all of your abdominal swelling.  And it does.

Every morning at 4am, they come in for labs.  Your nurse gets them from your central line, and once your central line comes out, the phlebotomist comes in, pokes your arm, and draws vials of blood to be tested for everything from electrolytes to liver panels and metabolic panels to simple, yet all-telling, complete blood counts.  When you leave the hospital, you will go to the out-patient lab twice a week for labs because of how important a few numbers are to rejecting or not rejecting your organ, and it won’t be until 1.5 months that you start going weekly.

When you finally get to go home from the hospital, you’ll be surprised how uncomfortable the ride is.  You’ll be afraid of bumps, turns, sudden stops, and seatbelts, and you’ll be surprised that bumps aren’t nearly as bad as turns.  When you get to your house, you’ll be surprised that yes, you can climb steps, and also at how much your dogs missed you. 

You’ll also be surprised to see you can’t get into bed, and you will go into a panic.  The day and the drive have exhausted you, and you need a bed!  When your dad removes your foam mattress topper (6” extra height) and you slowly log roll yourself onto your mattress, you will have no where to lay since your incision runs so deep into your right side.  You order special pillows and still sleep so uncomfortably.  After a few nights, you give up and sleep on the couch or in a big comfy chair.  You quickly find sleeping propped up on something is the only way you can actually get some sleep.  And naps are a necessity to a healing body … same thing goes.  Couch or chair.  You think this will never end, but after a month you get to sleep in your own bed again, and it feels so good to be “home.”

You visit the transplant clinic every week, then after maybe 1.5 months, every 2 weeks.  By week 6, the doctors let you come back in a month.  How exciting!

You’ll make two unfortunate trips to the emergency room before those first tough months are over – one for a leaking drain site, another for an infected and split-open incision.  They will both be difficult visits, one because of the discomfort and mess, another for the pain it entailed.  You hope that’s the last time you have to go to the ER for a very long time.  Being a transplant patient is even more complicated than being a liver patient.  ER doctors are even more scared of your history than before!

With the open incision, you decide it’s time to lay on the protein.  You have your mom pick up protein powder, and you make milk shakes (milk + protein in a shaker bottle!) that you reluctantly down at least once a day. You are determined your incision will heal.  Plus, you’re hoping the protein will be good for your body – Due to the new meds and your body’s adjusting, you don’t have much of an appetite and have been losing weight constantly since you came home from the hospital.  Now, at 2 months, you’ve lost a total of the high end of 20-some pounds since before the surgery took place.  Nothing fits, and you have every size Gap jean imaginable, not to mention at the present time, you’re ready to go buy a size 0.  Any smaller, then what happens?  You don’t want to even think about it.

You get a home nurse for about 3 weeks to measure the open incision and make sure it’s healing well.  You hope it closes by your 2nd month anniversary because it’s just a nuisance.  Wet to dry dressings, twice a day.  A routine you could live without.  And sure enough, the day before your 2nd month anniversary (yesterday), you wake up to find it completely intact.  You thank God even though you know your abdominal skin will now bear a huge scar, and you won’t have the feeling and sensation you once had.  Your scar and the surrounding area is numb to the touch, yet it somehow still throbs in a couple of places.  But at least it’s finally closed!

You enjoy the first 5-6 weeks laying low at home and enjoying visitors, and when you regain your driving privileges at 6 or 6.5 weeks, you’ll make lunch dates to catch up with your friends.  You quickly learn where your limits lie and remember you’re still not fully healed.  You sleep 10-12 hours a night, and anything less makes for a difficult day.  You call your nurse coordinator daily for a few weeks and then are amazed you can go a whole week without a new question or concern.  She’s happy for you and probably relieved you’re not as needy anymore!

You’re keenly aware of where you’ve been and are scared you’ll ever have to go back there again. You’re grateful for your faith, family, and friends, and know they’re a large reason you got through this.  The other reason is, you’re a fighter; you always have been and probably always will be.  And you know it.  And you know strength doesn’t come without a price.

While you’re not where you were on August 31st, you’re far from where you were September 1st, and that’s in itself a miracle and a blessing and everything good and wonderful.

So here’s to another 2 months of life, another 2 months of healing, and hoping these first several months will go by fast so you can feel better than ever.  Here’s to hoping you will have a profound story to write on that note you plan to send your donor’s family, a story of a life drastically changed by a selfless gift, a story of an existence improved beyond measure with the gift of one organ, an amazing transplant team at an record-breaking, award-winning hospital, and the patience of a few months’ time.

Thank you to everyone who’s been anywhere on this journey with me for the past 2 months.  Whether by a phone call, a blog comment, a visit, a card, a gift, a text message or a prayer… I will never forget the role you played in my life, how you helped me get through each day of a very hard time. 

I’m so grateful for these past 8 weeks and everything that’s led me to this place.  I can’t wait to see what’s next.  I’m full of gratitude, hope, and excitement.  I’m eager to see past recovery and discover the better version of everything with this brand new life I’ve been given.  I’ll keep you posted – I have a feeling good things are ahead

So much love,
Amanda