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Well friends, I finally made it onto oral antibiotics (praise God!) and my WBC level increased so I was discharged on Saturday. I was excited to get out, and I was thankful I didn’t have to have a port inserted for IV antibiotics.  Also, I was so glad I didn’t have to sit around in the hospital until my counts raised.  Surprisingly two Neupogen injections rose my WBC from 1 to 4(!!)

I have been very weak this week and am very swollen for some reason, but I don’t have any pneumonia symptoms anymore.  I don’t think I ever really did, though – other than the fever and chills the day I got admitted into the hospital.  I’m grateful my symptoms weren’t worse than they were, and I’m also glad the pneumonia didn’t become life-threatening.  With my immunosuppressant medications, the illness could have easily gone out of control.

I was on so many medications last week that a lot of the details are sketchy, but I do remember some great doctors, nurses, and friends.  I remember all of my hospital visitors and Danielle spending 2 nights with me, sleeping in the uncomfortable chair.  The cards, flowers… they, like they were a year ago, helped keep me encouraged.  Thanks, everyone.

So once my oral antibiotics are finished (Saturday) I’ll be past the pneumonia, thank God.

Now, the next obstacle is the splenectomy.  Next week I’m meeting with one of my liver surgeons who is the best choice to take out my spleen.  I’m also meeting with my oncologist and my infectious disease doctors, too.  All three are involved in my case right now.  I’m hoping to have the surgery scheduled at my visit Monday, so we’ll see.  It’s a big surgery, and I cannot get it done laparoscopically since my spleen is so large holding all of my blood cells.  That means a long hospital stay, long recovery, more pain, and more destruction to my poor abdomen! I’m not excited about it, but if this is the answer to improving my low white blood cells (and low platelets) then I think it will be worth it.

I have had dangerously low platelets since I was diagnosed with liver disease as a kid, and after my transplant, my white blood cells completely took a dive to “critical level.”  Platelets enable your blood to clot, while white blood cells protect your body against infection.  Deficiencies in both are big deals, and with the platelets, we just hoped they’d improve with the transplant.  They did a little bit – more so in the beginning – but now they’re dropping.  Either way, the biggest issue is the white blood cells.  I caught pneumonia because of them, and now my doctors are wanting to get my spleen out now as it “sucks up” and hides all of the blood cells my body is needing.  The worry is I could catch something far more destructive than “just” pneumonia.  So without my spleen, nothing will be completely filled up with my blood cells, or so is our hopes.  And if this doesn’t work?  We’re pretty much out of options.

When I am afraid, I will trust in you.
Psalm 56.3

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